Spring 2020

The “colonial turn” considerably transformed the field of French history and led to the publication in the last 30 years of a large number of scholarly contributions concerned with the cultural, political, legal, and social aspects of French colonialism. Meanwhile, the political economy of the French colonial empire has received far less attention. The 2008 financial crisis triggered renewed interest in the history of capitalism and economic history more generally, and we are now witnessing the effects of these changes in the field of French colonial history. This conference thus seeks to bring together a new generation of historians and economists who have recently published, or are about to publish, important contributions to the economic history of the French formal and informal empires. The conference does not seek to celebrate the “return” of concerns that were central in the 1970s but rather to better delineate the contours of a new momentum.

New Irish Fiction

Friday, April 3, 2020

Irish writers have long been at the forefront of formal experimentation in English-language fiction. Now, almost a hundred years after James Joyce and Samuel Beckett shattered expectations of the conventional novel, Irish writers are asking new questions about what fiction is capable of doing. Their works represent remarkable innovations in the representation of subjectivity, identity, and time in fiction. They are also deeply attuned to politics, writing in the wake of the global economic downturn, the collapse of the moral authority of the Catholic church, the Good Friday Agreement, and the creation of new forms of identity in Ireland. This panel brings together some of the most widely acclaimed and adventurous Irish writers of the twenty-first century to discuss the way forward for Irish fiction in a time of migration, right-wing populism, and increasing demands for gender, racial, economic, and climate justice. 

How did Beethoven influence the other arts? And how did literature shape the composer’s reputation? In an exploration of Beethoven’s literary afterlife through the lens of chamber performance, this event will examine the formation of a musical legacy. The event will feature faculty lectures by professors Nicholas Dames (Columbia), Arden Hegele (Columbia), and Nicholas Chong (Rutgers), as well as a performance of Beethoven’s violin sonata no. 7 (Op. 30, no. 2) by Chad Hoopes and Anne-Marie McDermott.

Events

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