Spring 2019

This year’s 13/13 seminar series will take this problem as its task: to buck centuries of contemplative complacency and return praxis to its proper place in the order of things. In doing so, the seminar will strive to address the most critical question today: What is to be done? And what exactly is critical praxis today?

Reframing Transgender Violence

Thursday, January 24, 2019 - Friday, January 25, 2019

Reframing Transgender Violence is the final public workshop of the Reframing Gendered Violence project at the Center for the Study of Social Difference at Columbia University. Reframing Gendered Violence opens up a critical global conversation among scholars and practitioners that recasts the problem of violence against women as it is currently discussed in a wide range of fields, both academic and policy-oriented, including human rights, public health, journalism, law, feminist studies, literature, sociology, religious studies, anthropology, and history.

A talk by Ben Etherington, Associate Professor in the School of Humanities and Communication Arts and a member of the Writing and Society Research Centre at Western Sydney University. The consideration of the totality of verbal arts (“world literature”) risks being separated into brute data and incommensurable particulars. To understand the unity which recent developments have rent apart this paper will revisit the tradition of critical humanist scholarship dedicated to thinking literary totality. 

Today, predicting the impact of human activities on the earth’s climate hinges on tracking interactions among phenomena of radically different dimensions, from the molecular to the planetary. Climate in Motion shows that this multiscalar, multicausal framework emerged well before computers and satellites. Extending the history of modern climate science back into the nineteenth century, Deborah R. Coen uncovers its roots in the politics of empire-building in central and eastern Europe. She argues that essential elements of the modern understanding of climate arose as a means of thinking across scales in a state—the multinational Habsburg Monarchy, a patchwork of medieval kingdoms and modern laws—where such thinking was a political imperative. Led by Julius Hann in Vienna, Habsburg scientists were the first to investigate precisely how local winds and storms might be related to the general circulation of the earth’s atmosphere as a whole. Linking Habsburg climatology to the political and artistic experiments of late imperial Austria, Coen grounds the seemingly esoteric science of the atmosphere in the everyday experiences of an earlier era of globalization. Climate in Motion presents the history of modern climate science as a history of “scaling”—that is, the embodied work of moving between different frameworks for measuring the world. In this way, it offers a critical historical perspective on the concepts of scale that structure thinking about the climate crisis today and the range of possibilities for responding to it.

The New Humanities Faculty Salons

Thursday, January 31, 2019

Please join Division of Humanities Dean Sarah Cole in welcoming our newest colleagues from across the division.  Hosted by the Division of Humanities in the Arts and Sciences and co-sponsored by the Society of Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities, the New Humanities Faculty Salons are an opportunity to meet the twelve new faculty members joining Columbia during the 2018-19 school year.  They will share their new research over drinks and snacks, opening conversations across the wider Humanities community.  All interested faculty and graduate students are encouraged to attend.

New Books in the Arts and Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Sheri Berman

'Utopia' is a fraught term for students and scholars of the 20th century. Yet the last few years have seen a push, as Benjamin Kohlmann recently put it, to "reclaim the value of utopianism while remaining conscious of its potential dangers" (Utopian Spaces of Modernism). This roundtable proceeds from the premise that utopia is, in a sense, 'back'—across different sub-fields, but perhaps especially in studies of modernism and contemporary literature.  So why utopia? Why now? Our conversation will explore both the "value" and the "potential dangers" of utopianism, past and present: as political agenda, in sciences of life, and at the level of narrative form. In dialogue around Visiting Professor Douglas Mao's forthcoming study of utopia, indignation, and justice, we will consider not only the promise and the perils of utopian projects, but also the possibility of critical and artistic models that resist the traditional utopia/anti-utopia paradigm.

The event will be a public conversation between the artist Mickalene Thomas and writer/activist Darnell Moore, moderated by Columbia Professor Kellie Jones.

Scholars have typically characterized Italy’s decolonization as abrupt and having little resonance in the peninsula at the time or subsequently. In this paper, I challenge this interpretation by demonstrating the visible and deeply felt impacts of repatriation by Italian settlers to the metropole at the time of events and the continued, if selective, visibility of these experiences in public debates during succeeding decades. In particular, I examine films and novels, arenas for which most scholars (with notable exceptions, e.g. Ben-Ghiat and Baratieri) posit an explicit silence about imperial defeat and repatriation that instead become displaced onto other themes. Re-reading such cultural artefacts, I argue, raises the possibility of what Michael Rothberg has deemed the work of multidirectional memories, “subject to ongoing negotiation, crossreferencing, and borrowing.”

Dr. Amitava Kumar will read from, and discuss, his recent novel Immigrant, Montana. One of The New Yorker‘s Best Books of 2018 and a New York Times Notable Book of 2018, the novel follows the protagonist Kailash on his American dream from a village in India to graduate school in New York, and focuses on the intersections of the sexual and the political.

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Hamid Dabashi

13/13 Seminar Series
9/13 | LEFT POPULISM

Wednesday, February 13, 2019

This year’s 13/13 seminar series will take this problem as its task: to buck centuries of contemplative complacency and return praxis to its proper place in the order of things. In doing so, the seminar will strive to address the most critical question today: What is to be done? And what exactly is critical praxis today?

What is the relation between biodiversity and linguistic diversity?  Why are the two concentrated in the same parts of the planet?  Languages disappear only through a process of being replaced by other languages. Can species extinction be thought of this way?  What makes it possible/impossible, or desirable/undesirable for collectivities to retain their languages? What does linguistic justice consist of? Does it include the right of access to languages of power, even if that access endangers “mother tongues”? How do people who have experienced language loss talk about it?

New Books in the Arts & Sciences and Justice Forum: Celebrating Recent Work by Bruce Western

Lecture by Dr. Kim Tallbear

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Lecture by Dr. Kim Tallbear

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Adam Reich and Peter Bearman

Legacies of Leftism in Film and Media Theory: East Asia and Beyond

Thursday, February 28, 2019 - Saturday, March 2, 2019

How have Leftist traditions inspired film and media theories across the world, and what can we learn from these traditions today as we explore new methodologies in film and media studies and new political possibilities in the contemporary world? 

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Pier Mattia Tommasino and Konstantina Zanou

Narrative in the Natural Sciences and Humanities

Thursday, February 28, 2019 - Friday, March 1, 2019

While all disciplines employ narrative in their work to summarize and communicate their theories, methods, and results, the realm of narrating (more colloquially known as storytelling) has traditionally been considered a literary or historical endeavor under the purview of the humanities and social sciences. This is no longer the case. As evidenced by the burgeoning fields of narrative medicine and science communication, narratives and narrating are also important tools for the natural sciences. Neuroscientists have even recently proposed that “narrative” may be a better way of theorizing about the processes by which the brain represents the context used to sort and order memories in order to create a timeline of events.

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Saidiya Hartman

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Nico Baumbach

Let’s Tell This Story Properly

Wednesday, March 6, 2019

Contemporary African Fiction: Let's Tell This Story Properly

This year’s 13/13 seminar series will take this problem as its task: to buck centuries of contemplative complacency and return praxis to its proper place in the order of things. In doing so, the seminar will strive to address the most critical question today: What is to be done? And what exactly is critical praxis today?

Poet Brenda Hillman is the author of Extra Hidden Life, among the Days; Seasonal Works with Letters on Fire; Practical Water; Pieces of Air in the Epic; Cascadia; Loose Sugar; Bright Existence; Death Tractates; Fortress; and White Dress.

Moving Bodies in Translation; La rage de vivre

Monday, March 11, 2019 - Tuesday, March 12, 2019

“Moving Bodies in Translation: Healing Trauma through Policy, Politics, ‘Artivism,’ and the Law” and La Rage de vivre

New Books in the Society of Fellows: Celebrating Recent Work by Will Slauter

Lionel Trilling (1905-75), one of Columbia's most celebrated faculty members, was among the great humanist scholars and public intellectuals of the 20th century. In his memory, the Heyman Center sponsors a series of intellectual conversations, known as the Lionel Trilling Seminars. This spring, we welcome short story writer, novelist, and translator Lydia Davis.

Please join students, colleagues, and friends of Lionel Trilling Professor Emeritus in the Humanities Ted Tayler (1931–2018) as they share memories of his effect on their lives

In a project I am currently developing as part of the Public Humanities fellowship, I am working with elder communities constructing alternative narratives about technology and decrepitude in order to open up new ways of thinking about technology that are detached from instrumentality and productivity. The project culminates with a series of workshops where participants experiment with obsolete and broken technology to develop their own creative works whereby they aim to engage other meanings of technology concerning repair, recycling, and non-instrumentality. In this paper, I will share the findings obtained so far from the workshops while providing a theoretical analysis of the paradoxes risen as a result of the encounter of the aged and technology.

The Caine Prize for African Writing is a literature prize awarded to an African writer of a short story published in English. The prize was launched in 2000 to encourage and highlight the richness and diversity of African writing by bringing it to a wider audience internationally. The focus on the short story reflects the contemporary development of the African story-telling tradition. Columbia University will host the 2018 Caine Prize winner, Makena Onjerika, for her short story ‘Fanta Blackcurrant’ published in Wasafiri (2017).

Transnational Feminist Futures

Monday, March 25, 2019

On March 25, 2018 from 4:15-6:16 pm,  IRWGS will bring together scholars and activists for our annual Transnational Feminist Futures roundtable conversation on transnational feminist theorizing and activism. This roundtable will feature Professors Laura Briggs (UMASS-Amherst), Paige West(Columbia/ Barnard College), Amina Mama (UC-Davis), among others.  Participants will explore the ways that transnational feminist theorizing and practices transform and reimagine contestations over issues such as human rights, constructions of patriarchies, and inclusionary/exclusionary practices of race, sexuality, and class.  

Founded in 1919 in the name of academic freedom, the New School for Social Research quickly became a pioneer in adult education—what its first president, Alvin Johnson, called “the continuing education of the educated." During the 1920s, the New School became the place to go to hear famous people lecture on politics, the arts, and recent developments in new fields of inquiry such as anthropology and psychoanalysis. In 1933 Johnson opened the University in Exile within the New School, providing visas and jobs for nearly two hundred refugees fleeing Hitler. And through these exiled scholars, he re-created in miniature the great intellectual traditions of Europe's imperiled universities.

The Committee on Equity and Diversity (CED) in Arts & Sciences will celebrate the life and work of Professor Marcellus Blount in Agents of Change: A Symposium in Honor of Marcellus Blount, on Low Library, Rotunda and Faculty Room, Tuesday, March 26, 1:00-4:30 pm. Speakers will include George Aumoithe, Sarah Cole, Zinga Fraser, Farah Jasmine Griffin, Jack Halberstam, Ellie Hisama, Jean Howard, Dennis Mitchell, Robert O’Meally, Rebecca Pawel, Richard Sacks, James Shapiro, Joseph Slaughter, Alan Stewart, Kendall Thomas, and Maya Tolstoy. This afternoon symposium will recognize Professor Blount's research, teaching, mentoring, and activism, and will feature a panel and a roundtable. Lloyd Knight, Principal Dancer of the Martha Graham Dance Company, will perform at the event.  

13/13 Seminar Series
11/13 | ASSEMBLIES

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

This year’s 13/13 seminar series will take this problem as its task: to buck centuries of contemplative complacency and return praxis to its proper place in the order of things. In doing so, the seminar will strive to address the most critical question today: What is to be done? And what exactly is critical praxis today?

Lipstick Lobotomy imagines the playwright’s great aunt Ginny and JFK’s little sister Rosemary Kennedy meeting at an exclusive high-end sanitarium for women in the fall of 1941. Ginny is desperate to be friends with the charismatic and stylish Rosemary and is not satisfied with the talk therapy at the Institute and pressures her doctors for more aggressive treatment. Meanwhile, Rosemary, forced into the institute by her famous family because of her intellectual disability, keeps trying to escape. Their friendship blossoms as Ginny tirelessly pursues increasingly aggressive medical intervention.  

This program is sponsored by the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality With support from the Office of the EVP for Arts & Sciences, Columbia University School of the Arts, The Society of  Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities, and the Department of Classics at Columbia University

The boundary between the humanities and quantitative social sciences has become permeable lately. But principled doubts about the humanistic significance of numbers can’t be dispelled by terms like “big data” that seem to point at the sheer speed and scale of computers. This talk will instead explore the interpretive assumptions that underpin statistical models, using examples drawn from the history of fantasy and science fiction to show how machine learning can be used to model specific historical vantage points and measure the parallax between perspectives. It is getting easier to move between qualitative and quantitative disciplines, I will argue, not because data is big, but because practices of statistical modeling have quietly drifted toward humanistic theories of interpretation.

Ovidius Philosophus

Friday, March 29, 2019 - Saturday, March 30, 2019

An international conference on philosophy in Ovid and Ovid as a philosopher.

As a set of disciplines, the humanities face the challenge of how to write about embodied experiences that resist easy verbal categorization such as illness, pain, and healing. The recent emergence of interdisciplinary frameworks such as narrative medicine has offered a set of methodological approaches to address these challenges. Conceptualizing a field of medical humanities provides a broad umbrella under which to study the influence of medico-scientific ideas and practices on society.  Whether by incorporating material culture such as medical artefacts, performing symptomatic readings of poems and novels, or excavating the implicit medical assumptions underlying auditory cultures, the approaches that emerge from a historiographical or interpretive framework are different from those coming from the physician’s black bag. This two-day workshop will continue the work of the Explorations in the Medical Humanities lecture series from 2017-2018, with a new emphasis on creating an interdisciplinary conversation between scholars from a variety of institutions. 

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Claudio Lomnitz

New Books in the Society of Fellows: Celebrating Recent Work by Murad Idris, Jordanna Bailkin and Ilana Feldman

Empire By Its Other Names

Friday, April 5, 2019 - Saturday, April 6, 2019

"Empire By Its Other Names" aims to map the political formations of violence that organize and govern contemporary political life. Following Trump’s election, questions emerged about how to best typify this regime: Is it fascism, authoritarianism, or populism? A new or old form of white supremacy? The truth of American democracy, or its betrayal? The essence of neo-liberalism, or a backlash against it? On the other hand, do these questions presuppose a form of American exceptionalism, accounting for it by discounting its global contexts? And is the perplexity and urgency surrounding Trump not itself symptomatic of American exceptionalism? By thinking through some primary orders of violence, this conference will systematically place these questions and themes within a wider global history.

Religion and the Future

Friday, April 5, 2019

The graduate students of Columbia University’s Department of Religion's conference this year will explore religion and the future for the department’s annual graduate student conference. We are interested in the points of intersection, contested and shifting boundaries, symbiotic relationships, and antagonisms of “religion” and the “future” (broadly conceived),  examinations of which represent a space of enormous potential for our discipline.

The 2019 Edward W. Said Memorial Lecture will be given by Viet Thanh Nguyen. 

The New Humanities Faculty Salons

Monday, April 8, 2019

Please join Division of Humanities Dean Sarah Cole in welcoming our newest colleagues from across the division.  Hosted by the Division of Humanities in the Arts and Sciences and co-sponsored by the Society of Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities, the New Humanities Faculty Salons are an opportunity to meet the twelve new faculty members joining Columbia during the 2018-19 school year.  They will share their new research over drinks and snacks, opening conversations across the wider Humanities community.  All interested faculty and graduate students are encouraged to attend.

Conversation: Viet Thanh Nguyen

Monday, April 8, 2019

Join CSER for the latest in the Artist at the Center series, as author Viet Thanh Nguyen is joined by Deborah Paredez and Hang Nguyen for a conversation and Q&A.

This event will take place April 9 at CSER in 420 Hamilton Hall from 7-9pm. All the authors will be doing a reading of their work.

This book chronicles the dawn of the global movement for women's rights in the first decades of the twentieth century. The founding mothers of this movement were not based primarily in the United States, however, or in Europe. Instead, Katherine M. Marino introduces readers to a cast of remarkable Latin American and Caribbean women whose deep friendships and intense rivalries forged global feminism out of an era of imperialism, racism, and fascism. Six dynamic activists form the heart of this story: from Brazil, Bertha Lutz; from Cuba, Ofelia Domíngez Navarro; from Uruguay, Paulina Luisi; from Panama, Clara González; from Chile, Marta Vergara; and from the United States, Doris Stevens. This Pan-American network drove a transnational movement that advocated women’s suffrage, equal pay for equal work, maternity rights, and broader self-determination. Their painstaking efforts led to the enshrinement of women's rights in the United Nations Charter and the development of a framework for international human rights. But their work also revealed deep divides, with Latin American activists overcoming U.S. presumptions to feminist superiority. As Marino shows, these early fractures continue to influence divisions among today’s activists along class, racial, and national lines.

Politics of the Present
Border People

Wednesday, April 10, 2019

Based on conversations and interviews from the South Bronx housing projects, Refugee Safe Houses on the Northern Border with Canada, and travels along the Southwestern Border and into Mexico, Dan Hoyle's newest piece of "journalistic theater" is his freshest and most urgent. Ten monologues of people who live on or across borders both literal and metaphorical, an intimate, raw, poignant, funny look at the borders we all negotiate in our everyday lives.

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Beth Berkowitz

This symposium is one of many discussions on the “Crises of Democracy” hosted by a number of institutions in a variety of locations, including Reid Hall in Paris and Trinity College Dublin.  Panelists at Columbia will discuss issues affecting democracy across the globe, including "The Populist Appeal of Strongmen," "Weaponizing the Classics," and "Journalists at Risk." 

Proust 2019

Friday, April 12, 2019

Speakers: Anne Carson, Nicholas Dames, Sara Danius, Lydia Davis, Saskia Hamilton, Andrew Holleran, Elisabeth Ladenson, Michael Lucey, Colm Toibin, Caroline Weber, Edmund White, Michael Wood.

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Maria Victoria Murillo and Ernesto Calvo

13/13 Seminar Series
12/13 | HUMAN WEAPONS

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

This year’s 13/13 seminar series will take this problem as its task: to buck centuries of contemplative complacency and return praxis to its proper place in the order of things. In doing so, the seminar will strive to address the most critical question today: What is to be done? And what exactly is critical praxis today?

Translating Ovid’s Sexual Violence

Thursday, April 18, 2019

Translating Ovid’s Sexual Violence with Stephanie McCarter and Jia Tolentino

Mythologized as the era of the “good war” and the “Greatest Generation,” the 1940s are frequently understood as a more heroic, uncomplicated time in American history. Yet just below the surface, a sense of dread, alienation, and the haunting specter of radical evil permeated American art and literature. Writers returned home from World War II and gave form to their disorienting experiences of violence and cruelty. They probed the darkness that the war opened up and confronted bigotry, existential guilt, ecological concerns, and fear about the nature and survival of the human race. In Facing the Abyss, George Hutchinson offers readings of individual works and the larger intellectual and cultural scene to reveal the 1940s as a period of profound and influential accomplishment.

Join historians Ardeta Gjikola and Alex Wragge-Morley as they discuss Wragge-Morley’s new book reinterpreting the role of aesthetic experience in scientific practice. To mark the forthcoming publication of Aesthetic Science: Representing Nature in the Royal Society of London, 1650-1720, Alex Wragge-Morley and Ardeta Gjikola will engage in a wide-ranging discussion about the place of taste, judgment, and sensory pleasure in the production of scientific knowledge.

Marina Carr’s By the Bog of Cats premiered on Dublin’s national stage, the Abbey Theatre, in 1998 to wide acclaim. Based on Euripides’ Medea, the play tells the story of Hester Swane, an outsider in her small rural community, driven to acts of vengeance and self-destruction. The play raises important questions about the status of outsiders, the treatment of women and mothers, and the roots of violence. In this conversation, Lisa Dwan and Marina Carr will discuss the stakes in adaptations of the Classics, Dwan and Carr’s shared Beckett influence, as well as the role of women in theater today.

What is the future of the encyclopedia in the internet age, and what role might historians of science play in that future? Historians of science have long engaged with public-facing initiatives, but as the discipline has professionalized our conversations have increasingly taken place behind paywalls and within academic presses. On the occasion of the launching of the online, open-access Encyclopedia of the History of Science, this roundtable discussion will focus on the history of attempts to use digital and electronic resources to develop and deepen academic fields. Focusing on both the pitfalls and possibilities of such resources, the discussants—Christopher Phillips, Pamela Smith, Alex Wellerstein, and Emily Bloom—will engage with the question of how to shape such an initiative to be lasting and valuable. What might be gained and lost by creating a resource that provides a more holistic, up-to-date, and easily accessible portrayal of the history of science than is currently available? 

with Michele Moody-Adams (Philosophy - Columbia University), Akeel Bilgrami (Philosophy - Columbia University), and Jane Anderson (Anthropology and Museum Studies - NYU)

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by James Zetzel

American Standard

Wednesday, May 1, 2019

A poem by Paul Muldoon, read by Lisa Dwan, with a discussion to follow

The Caribbean is often described as a region in crisis. In the aftermath of recent natural disasters in the region, the Caribbean is understood to be uniquely imperiled by climate change and is subjected to various forms of political and fiscal intervention. In September 2017, Hurricanes Irma and Maria ravaged the region and elevated questions surrounding climate change and its impacts on the Caribbean to the forefront of political discourse. The hurricanes of 2017 marked the latest in a series of environmental crises in the region, which include the volcanic disasters of 1995 and 1997 in Montserrat, the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, and an increasing quantity and intensity of hurricanes and tropical storms. Meanwhile, Caribbean states and territories are afflicted by crises in governing legitimacy, as sovereign debt, multinational disinvestment, and heightened rates of violent crime threaten political order. The aims of this conference are both empirical and theoretical. First, this conference features ethnographic research on the impacts of natural disaster and political crisis throughout the Caribbean. Secondly, this conference considers how empirical perspectives from the Caribbean inform approaches to political anthropology in an epoch of anthropogenic climate change. #StatesOfCrisis

This year’s 13/13 seminar series will take this problem as its task: to buck centuries of contemplative complacency and return praxis to its proper place in the order of things. In doing so, the seminar will strive to address the most critical question today: What is to be done? And what exactly is critical praxis today?

Crises of Democracy at Reid Hall

Friday, May 17, 2019 - Saturday, May 18, 2019

This conference at Reid Hall is part of a series of talks and events in Paris, Columbia's Morningside Heights campus, and Trinity College Dublin, in which participants will discuss issues affecting democracy across the globe. At our current moment, democracy itself seems to be in crisis, as a practice, a set of institutions, and an ideal. The rhythm of everyday life does not help, in tune with the tempo of news cycles, deflection, and legalized zones of lawlessness. Scholarship has however long provided for an alternative pace, and a distinct space for the analysis of and speculations about democracy, its crises and absences, its various histories, social dynamics, and cultural manifestations. Drawing from the academic community built by the Society of Fellows in the Humanities at Columbia University over its forty year existence, and as its inaugural Alumni Conference, this conference aims to map the relationship between democracy and crisis. Former fellows from across fields are invited to present their work on the ways in which ideals and practices of democracy have been debated in theory, probed historically, and produced culturally: Is the contemporary moment exceptional, in its double sense that democracy has been thrown into crisis and that crises have upended democratic life, or has this become the new normal? Was it previously or ever a norm? Is it possible—or right—to conceptualize democracy without reference to crisis? Where is democracy put into crises, and what does it look like? Is democracy’s crisis a problem with the demos, with the enemies of democracy, or with the operations of democracy itself? If democratic states have also tended to be aggressive and expansionist, is democracy another name for empire? Is crisis peculiar to democracy, and are democracy’s crises distinctive? The panels of this conference will seek to use the ideas of crisis and democracy as windows into each other, focusing on “crisis” and on “democracy,” and then, taken together, as a canvas onto which the contemporaneity of historical crises and the historicity of contemporary anxieties have been inscribed.

How do we use metaphors to make sense of cognition, memory, and emotions? This public exhibition will feature metaphors of the mind across cultural, linguistic, social, and disciplinary practices. Episodes include conversations with neuroscientists, historians, literary scholars, and cell biologists who grapple with the physical objects that have been used to anchor and articulate the invisible processes of thinking and feeling. The event will include a discussion panel with Dr. Lan A. Li and Dr. Alex Wragge-Morley. This public exhibition will follow the Metaphors of the Mind workshop, held on the same day, which will bring together scholars interested in examining the extraordinarily rich variety of languages and images used to describe the mind and its operations.

Please join us to celebrate Conrad's life at a gathering on May 18th at 2 PM in the main reading room of Columbia University's C.V. Starr East Asian Library

CHCI Medical Humanities Summer Institute: “Health Beyond Borders”

Friday, June 14, 2019 - Saturday, June 15, 2019

This conference explores the interdisciplinary facets of the border, from the metaphorical to the political: What counts as a border in an embodied, geographical, legal, or artistic context? What are the debates around borders in medical practice, from hospitalist medicine to epidemiology? How and why do health practitioners refer to the border for its rhetorical power, and how does the border work productively as a figure in narrative medicine, medical memoirs, and creative literature? What are the processes and structures that define well-being across borders, from nationalist immigration policies to environmental protections? How do we understand efforts to confront, dismantle, or transcend borders in healthcare? What role do borders play in the formation of state-sanctioned health policies, and how might these enable or obstruct initiatives in global health? And how might the concept of the boundary reshape our visions of a future health beyond borders? 

The Confined Arts presents From the Inside Out: The Power of Language to Incarcerate, a one-day justice conference in New York City that will meet and resist linguistic methods of dehumanization, which foster implicit and explicit biases about people in the criminal justice system. The mission the conference is to unveil popular labels, which are coupled with negative imagery about people in the system and provide re-humanizing counter narratives using the power of storytelling to highlight true-lived experiences. More specifically, the audience will engage with stigmatized labels couple with (mis)representative imagery and be given a historical context of how labels foster misconceptions about incarceration and the people that are incarcerated.

Events

By Semester